Blogging Life, Christian Living, Relevant Updates, Writing, Young Adult Life

The End of the Right Kind of Writer.

Yes, you have read that right. The RKW’s velvet red curtains are closing, and I’m slipping off behind them to work backstage. In other words: this is the last post on the Right Kind of Writer.

What?! Why??” you might be thinking. Sorry, I guess this might seem really random. I’ve only told a few people, actually, but I’ve been thinking about it for months.

As for the why? There are a number of good reasons, that all boil down to these:

It’s an unnecessary burden, time-consuming, and a distraction.

An Unnecessary Burden

Blogging. . . I can never decide whether it’s been more fun or painfully difficult. I know for sure that it’s strained my logic, creativity, and writing in amazing ways, but it’s been hard.

Who knows how many brain cells I’ve lost from blogging stress! I wish it were all fun, but recently, only a few times have I sincerely enjoyed it. It’s just. . . a lot; even too much. And I know that a lot of the pressure is something I put on myself. However, the way my brain works, this is the best way to lift that burden.

Time-Consuming

I’m a slow writer and a slow thinker. I’d much rather prefer quality over quantity when it comes to blog posts—and another reason I’m quitting blogging is that my blog writing is deeply lacking quality, as I try to reach every deadline, and miss several.

Back to topic, though, both qlty and qty take time. . . lots of it. The RKW has taken time from school and WIP writing mostly, but many other activities else as well. I don’t think I’d want to know how many hours I’ve spent on this platform-building project.

Even as of now, I could be doing several more pressing tasks, but I wanted to get this out of the way as soon as possible.

A Distraction

Not only is the RKW a literal distraction from other activities, but it’s a distraction from the type of audience and blog I truly want. I have a crazy mixed audience, and that’s a big reason why, on average, only about 10% of my followers interact with my posts.

The RKW is more of a lifestyle blog covering a too-broad area of topics. Imagine if I tried publishing today—I’d be super lucky if even 15% of my followers bought the book for motives other than me being their friend or family.

With a very focused, intent, and quality blog, the percentage of interaction and financial involvement per person would probably be much higher. A blog like that is what I’ll be considering when I’m closer to publication.


Those are the chief reasons. I hope you understand why I’m stopping; I’ve weighed the pros and cons several times, and the pros skyrocket the cons. I’ve prayed about it, and I believe this is a good decision.

Then What’s Next for Me?

Concerning writing, I’ll be working on the Work-in-Progress I talked about a couple weeks ago. I’ve been making good progress on it, and I’m excited to see what the finished project will look like!

I’m continuing or planning some other non-school-related projects as well, like driving, guitar, the marathon, and getting a job. Without the immediate stress of a blog, I can better focus on those too.

As for publication. . . I don’t plan on publishing my current WIP. One of my ideas is that I go through a few drafts of my current WIP for practice, write a novella, then focus on a new book for publication. My goal is to get traditionally published. This would be awesome, but we’ll see what God’s plan is, if it’s anything like mine.


Now of course, I need to thank people. I won’t say names (because I don’t have the space, privacy reasons, and I hope you know who you are), but, if you’ve given advice, supported this blog in person and online, shared a post, helped with graphics, and/or if you’ve listened to my stressed-out ranks, I am grateful and indebted. *bows*


To those who have subscribed recently: I’m sorry you get this news so early in your involvement here!

I have good news, though! I’m not deleting this blog—it’s still going to be up on the Internet, maybe forever (or maybe someday I’ll make it private or something; who knows?).

Thus, below I’ve compiled a list of my ten favorite Right Kind of Writer posts (not necessarily in order), for you to (hopefully) enjoy.

1. The Autumn Haven: a Short Story

This was the second piece of fiction writing I published on my blog (but we don’t talk about the first one 😉). I was surprised and humbled by the responses I received toward the story. It’s probably my favorite post.

In this story, I focused on showing, not telling.

2. Change of Environment = Increased Productivity

You should see the original piece. 😅 Again, I was mildly shocked by the number of people who liked this post. I was a beginner and my writing was horrible. Since its first publication, I’ve continued to edit it to make it a much more readable and helpful post! It’s probably my second favorite post.

3. From Reign to Ice: a Short Story (Full Version)

This post served as a cover reveal, second half, and full version, of a short story. I had released the earlier half that ended in a cliffhanger. I really enjoyed writing it!

In this story, I focused on character development.

4. When Your Hardest Doesn’t Go Highest (Society’s Secret Scandal)

This post didn’t get a huge response, but I felt it was a healthy reminder for me personally. It’s short (for me), but I think the message is important.

5. Kingstorms: a Flash Fiction

I released Kingstorms during the summer because I had no other post prepared. I’m glad people enjoyed it! I guess it’s one of my more popular posts.

In this story, I focused on emotion.

6. Quantity vs. Quality: a Question of Ethics

This is an ethically, logically-focused post on some thoughts I had in my mind. I hope it inspires thought and debate!

7. Why Fasting is Better Than You Think

My Church family had just concluded 21 days of prayer and fasting when I posted this. I didn’t think it was very well written, but my parents shared their thoughts and edits on it, and when it was published, people seemed to like it! I hope it made them think.

8. I Finally Finished Beyond the Wolf

A celebratory (and advice) post!!! Throughout my blogging history, I brought up my two-year Work-in-Progress Beyond the Wolf several times. I expected it to be 50-70K words. It was over 100K. Goodness, I was so relieved to have finally typed up the ending.

9. To The Discouraged Writer

I wrote this post of encouragement when I had been doubting myself. It’s not very good, but emotionally, it helped me and I guess several other readers.

10. Yellow Balloons: an Album Review

Among all of these, this is my most recent. And, honestly, it is my tenth favorite out of the top ten. This is a review of one of my favorite albums, Yellow Balloons, by David Dunn. It’s *cough* not short, but I put a good deal of my heart and thought into it.


And here we are again. This post is long. . . but did you expect anything different from me? 🙃 Goodness, I think I might actually miss blogging. Who knows. Well, God does.

I could ramble on, but indeed, I don’t have anything else of importance to say.

So, farewell, and God bless!

With God’s help,

~Daniel Amador

Christian Living, Relevant Updates, Young Adult Life

What I’ve Been Up To + Some Thoughts on Children’s Ministry

July has shot by like a rocket (and I’ve definitely been feeling the heat of the boosters! 😅). I’ve been doing a whole lot, as usual. That’s one reason this post is so late (sorry!). But even though things get overwhelming quick, I’m grateful to God for the opportunities he’s given me.


One such opportunity is CYIA. What’s that? First, let me explain what CEF is.

Child Evangelism Fellowship (CEF) is a worldwide organization, in nearly every country of the world. Its mission is to spread the Gospel to every child in the world. Their vision has been to do this through the youth (teenagers) of the world. They recruit young people to reach even younger people.

One such means of recruiting youth to reach children is CYIA—Christian Youth in Action. It is an intense, eleven-ten day training, where us youth (ages 12-18, generally) learn how to share the gospel with kids (ages 5-12, generally) through 5-Day-Clubs, specifically.

What are 5-Day-Clubs, though? They are clubs, or gatherings, of kids, once every day, Monday through Friday. We teach the Gospel through games, missionary stories, Bible lessons, and more.

So those are the main activities I’ve been doing this summer! If you’re still confused, comment. 🙃

CYIA Has Had a Big Impact on My Life

It’s strengthened me mentally, physically, spiritually, and more. I’ve become bolder in public speaking, I’ve grown a stronger love for children, and I’ve gotten better at memorization.

But those are only a few things! From building friendships to learning how to avoid drama, and beyond, the lessons and skills I’ve acquired are truly something only God can give me.

I’ve also learned so much more about the importance of children’s ministry.

Friends, Children’s Ministry is SO Important!

Here Are Some Reasons Why.

1. They are the next generation. So are we teens. The more who know the truth of the world and the love of Jesus, the better. The more we teens are challenged in many things, the stronger we become if we persevere.

2. Jesus had a special connection with children. He said, “let the little children come to me.” Who knows how many of those children he had just met, when he was teaching somewhere in the Middle East? He accepted every one of them.

When others rejected them, even the disciples of Jesus, he went and talked with them, taught them in ways only the Creator of all beings could do. We can’t connect with children quite like Jesus can, but we can try, can’t we?

3. They’re unwritten stories. As a writer, I think about peoples’ lives as stories often. I sometimes try to imagine them as people with backstories, fears, desires, and goals, similar to the characters I fantasize about in my mind.

Most children’s lives are just beginning. They could either have a villain’s backstory that forms them to be unforgiving cold people. . . or we could help give them the right kind of childhood, however we can. From asking how their day was to playing tag with them.

Childhood is vital to the growth and chapters of someone’s life story.

4. The Bible talks about how only a child’s heart can enter the kingdom of Heaven.

Jesus said, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.” -Mathew 19:14, NIV.

And he said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Therefore, whoever takes the lowly position of this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven. And whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me.” -Matthew 18:3-5, NIV.

So what do these verses mean? That only kids can enter Heaven? No, of course not! It could take me a whole post to explain these (read more about kids and Heaven in last week’s post!), but the point is. . . little children have some things that most older people do not. Free imagination, simple trust, such as that.

Children have a special place in most people’s hearts, but especially in Jesus’. They must be reached.

So. . . What Can You Do?

Kids need the Good News—the Gospel—and like Jesus once said, the harvest is plenty, but the workers are few. Most people reading this are probably youth: young people, hopefully with a love of Jesus.

Thus, I encourage you to find a way to serve Jesus and spread the News through children’s ministry. Here are two ways:

1. Research your local CYIA! Get in touch, text, or call the leaders. I guarantee you—if this blog is available to you, so is a CEF group. At https://www.cefonline.com/, you can find the information you need for where you’re at. It takes just a little research.

2. See how you can get involved in children’s ministry in your church. I’ve served only a few times in Sunday school. It’s not for everyone. However, I’m not going to say that it’s not for me—though as of now I’m in the church’s tech team (composed of only youth 😉) and a regular volunteer wherever. See what you can do!

 But do more than just preach at kids—though we kinda do that with 5 Day Clubs, we get very involved with the kids. Try getting involved in the lives of the kids in your church, neighborhood, or apartment! Then step by step, share the Gospel.

Have a good, God-filled rest of the week! See you in August.

Christian Living, Reviews (songs & books)

Yellow Balloons: an Album Review

Morning, I trust you are being productive this July! I have not been! I don’t know. Life’s crazy, kids. Now back to our topic, which was. . ? Oh yeah, I was going to share with you an album review!

I’m sorry this post is so long (1,300+ words), but it’s divided into sections, and I hope that makes it more skimmable while still allowing you to catch the message!

Side note: each link is to a Spotify page. Sorry, I don’t really do YouTube.


David Dunn is the most underrated artist I listen to. He crosses Christian pop, contemporary, and electro-ish (don’t quote me). He’s in my top ten, and for good reason, I think.

Dunn has four albums: For the Life of Me (2012), Crystal Clear (2015), Yellow Balloons (2017), and Perspectives (2020), along with a few EPs and singles. Yellow Balloons is my favorite, and was masterfully written, organized, and created. Let me explain why.

It’s a short 10-track, 37 min 57 sec album, but it packs a powerful punch. Here’s the tracklist, along with the duration time in parenthesis:

1. Kingdom (3:06)

2. Open Arms (3:48)

3. Grace Will Lead Me Home (4:11)

4. I Don’t Have to Worry (3:17)

5. I Wanna Go Back (3:50)

6. Ruins (3:05)

7. History (3:11)

8. Masterpiece (3:37)

9. Vacation (5:59)

10. Yellow Balloons (3:49)

Looking at the cover, I thought this would be a fun, lighthearted, thoughtful, electro album.

The cover, copyright to David Dunn, I assume. In other words: don’t steal.

But oh was I wrong! With most albums, even Dunn’s others, there are a few themes and overarching messages, usually tying into the album’s cover and title. However, sometimes the connections are loose, or there’s no connection at all. Yellow Balloons differs dramatically.

No song in the album is random. They all align—very strongly. The cover itself, with the yellow lines and picture of Dunn, doesn’t relate too much. But the album title, which is the title of the last track as well, is incredibly fitting.

I’ll just spoil the themes now—according to David Dunn in one interview, most of the songs are about Heaven and little kids/childhood; a third and fourth theme I noticed is the security we have in God (which I’ll call “security”) and restoration. But we’re not done yet on the depth.

I’ll explain further, but right now, I’m going to go song by song, name the themes present, and offer a short explanation! Also, say whether the song is slow/bittersweet or upbeat/profound, and provide some lines.


1. Kingdom

Theme(s): Heaven. Sound: upbeat/thoughtful. This song reaffirms some important theologies of Heaven. So many people have this image of Heaven in their minds, and a lot of the time it’s faulty. Heaven as the afterlife is better than we can ever imagine.

The song says: “Not Just a set of pearly gates and angels with wings, no it’s more / Heaven is here, Heaven is now / Heaven is a thing that is coming down / Lives in the hearts of those who believe / The Kingdom of God that’s living in me.

2. Open Arms

Theme(s): security, restoration. Sound: slow/bittersweet. It talks about how God is strong enough to handle our messy life and broken hearts. How He’s always waiting for us to turn to Him.

The song says: When we find ourselves inside the darkness / And confusion is hiding where the light is / He is always there, with open arms.

3. Grace Will Lead Me Home

Theme(s): Heaven, restoration. Sound: slow/bittersweet. This song talks about a place of rest; the Christian’s true home—Heaven. Only through God’s grace, mercy, and forgiveness can we have access to Heaven. Some parts are based on John Newton’s Amazing Grace, I believe.

The song says: Through every trial I have come / Only Your grace will lead me home.

4. I Don’t Have to Worry

Theme(s): Security, childhood. Sound: upbeat/thoughtful. This song gives examples of popular radical Bible stories, like David beating Goliath. These are things we hear as little kids, but when you think about it. . . our God is so powerful. So, with Him watching over us, we don’t have to worry.

The song says: I know; You split the sea / And You held it there; for the world to see / I-I know; that deadly flames / Were made powerless; when they Heard Your Name / So what am I so afraid of?

5. I Wanna Go Back

Theme(s): childhood. Sound: upbeat/thoughtful. The most popular track on the album, this song is about returning and being reminded of the simple, strong faith many have in their childhood—before adult and teenage struggles poisoned our faith.

The song says: And then I grew up / And then I got older / And my life got tough/ And we grew apart / Oooh, I wanna go back / To “Jesus loves me, this I know” / “For the Bible tells me / “For the Bible tells me so.”

6. Ruins

Theme(s): restoration. Sound: upbeat/thoughtful. This song is an imagery of the ruins and rubble of your life, and the truth that God can use those broken pieces to build something new in and for you.

The song says: Tomorrow’s hard to see when, you’re not there / The broken, the busted, the world that you trusted / Is gone / What if the rubble that you stand in / Are the perfect pieces that the Builder needs?

7. History

Theme(s): Security, restoration. Sound: upbeat/thoughtful. This song ponders the “what ifs” in the scenario of a perfect world (Adam and Eve not sinning), then decides that God has history in His hands.

The song says: What God did with history / To me it’s just a mystery / And I don’t know, that’s ok / Oh cause faith is just a funny thing / I believe, He knows better than me.

8. Masterpiece

Theme(s): restoration. Sound: upbeat/thoughtful. We are His masterpieces. God doesn’t make mistakes, and he has a plan for each of us.

The song says: You, make, a symphony / From broken melodies / You do it beautifully / You, take, the mess of me / Make it a masterpiece / You make a masterpiece

9. Vacation

Theme(s): Security, restoration. Sound: slow/bittersweet. This song is a cry to God for rest. He, David Dunn, wants “a vacation” from the stresses of time and life, to be with Jesus.

The song says: I wanna go where the clocks all stand still / To get away from the heat and the uphill / Where all the work is through / And all I need is You / I wanna take a vacation, just to be with You.

10. Yellow Balloons

Theme(s): Heaven, childhood. It ponders security and restoration. Sound: slow/bittersweet. This one changes everything. . . the deep truths you notice in those upbeat songs that turn them from “boppy” to heart-breakingly bittersweet.

See, this whole album was almost a therapy, let’s say, for Dunn. A storm of thoughts and emotions as he processed the tragic death of his two-year-old niece, Moriah. Her death was a medical mystery, and it struck the family hard.

The song says: So we cry on her birthdays / And wish that we knew / Why You took her to Heaven / So soon / And we beg for Your presence / We beg for more of You / ‘Cause our beautiful girl / Left the world.


The album was released in 2017, and she died in 2015. The song Yellow Balloons is achingly raw and honest, as Dunn struggled to find hope and trust in God. Unlike most tracks in the album, this one I’m careful to not listen to whenever.

Why? It’s personal and deep. A lot of people listen to songs just because they sound good, and Dunn’s voice alone with a sad guitar is beautiful. . . but the lyrics mean just as much to me.

In Conclusion. . .

Releasing yellow balloons into the sky at a memorial is a practice that a lot of people do, including David Dunn’s family. They’re a symbol of hope, a bright ‘glow’ in a dark time.

Each theme alone seems regular at first for a Christian artist, but when you put them all together, the pieces start to fit together, and then you get to the last song. . . this album just wows me.

The album Yellow Balloons has catchy tunes and mesmerizing sounds, but it’s also plenty full of depth. That is why this is one of my favorite albums ever. I hope you’ll give it a listen, and also take a minute or two to pray for families that are hurting because of similar tragic losses.

Christian Living, Guest Posts & Collabs, Specials

A Father’s Day Collab (With Anna & Joelle)

Hello-hello! Happy Father’s Day! Well, actually, I doubt many fathers are reading this, so, um, children, do something nice for your dad today. (:

Last month I decided to do my Mother’s Day post solo; today, Father’s Day, I have the honor of writing with Anna and Joelle! This blog collaboration is different from my last collab, where we posted each other’s pieces as well as our own.

For this, we three will each publish our posts individually, and link to each other’s blogs. Find Joelle’s post here, and Anna’s here!

We have each decided to pick a song, and write a note to/about our fathers based on it.

The Song

I chose Not All Heroes Wear Capes by Owl City. (Spotify link: here.) Not All Heroes Wear Capes by Owl City (of Adam Young) has been a classic for Father’s Day in my family for years. My family’s been a big fan of Owl City for most of my life. It’s only fitting, I think, that this song takes the stage now.

Adam Young is a master at making songs that sound and feel reminiscent, soft, and bittersweet, and that especially plays true in Not All Heroes Wear Capes. The song is explicitly about his dad, who, as Adam sings, is his hero.

Before you continue, listen to the song.

Verse 3: My dad isn’t a mechanic, but in the yard with treehouses and stone paths, with our house full of home-made beds, desks, shelves. . . “he can [build] just about anything.”

Verse 2: He’s a pastor, and thus not quite “a man of few words,” but he uses them incredibly. I’ve always had mixed thoughts about his career, and what that means for us Amadors. It has its benefits and trials, but I have this final conclusion. . . I’m so glad to have a dad after God’s own heart.

The Chorus: I mentioned above that “he built [his kids] a house in the arms of a tree,” a treehouse. He’s always done so much for us, and you can see just a sample of that by looking at our full backyard. Really, just look at his playlists! From what I know, he loves U2 (and Coldplay?) best, but his Apple Music is full of songs he added just because he knew we loved them, or we asked. Rap, hip-hop, country, Contemporary Christian, pop, rock, instrumental, you name it.

He’s not perfect, but I see my dad try hard to invest in all his eight kids’ lives and dreams. If you’re wondering—yeah, that definitely means he’s often encouraging me in my writing.

“He[’s teaching] me how to drive, fight, and dream.” I mentioned dreams above. As for fighting, literally speaking: all throughout my childhood, we kids (my brothers and I, often our sisters too) spent time wrestling throughout the upstairs bedrooms. I’ll always treasure those memories.

Figuratively, he’s been teaching me to fight through life. Fight through the difficulties, do hard things. I’d be much more of a coward without him firmly pushing me forward.

He’s taken me out to learn to drive only a few times, but we do plan on going out more often.

“When he looks in my eyes, I hope he can see that / my dad’s a hero to me.” Funny thing, the looking-in-eyes, thing. I can be shy, and I’m short, so often I would not look into adults’ eyes when talking to them. He’d always instruct me to look directly into their eyes; I’ve been practicing, and I’m much better at eye contact now, onstage and one-on-one. *nods*

My dad and I don’t have a perfect relationship. We disagree, get frustrated, and I often struggle to communicate certain things with him. But, papá, you are an inspiration, and I know that I’m so blessed to have a dad like you. Thanks for all you do, and happy Father’s Day! 😄

With God’s help,

Daniel Amador

Christian Living, Specials

When the Day of Roses & Hugs for Mothers Ends, Don’t Forget

Here’s a regular conversation:

“Hey, Simon! How’s life? How did that History presentation go?” asked Lily.

“Wassup! Life’s alright. The History thing was better than I thought, but now I have a big Math test coming up. How’ve you been?”

“Oof, Math sucks. Hope it goes well. I’ve been pretty great, actually! My cousins flew in the day before yesterday, so hanging out with them has been fun. What about- oh, are those new shoes? They look great!” exclaimed Lily.

“Thanks! Yeah, my mom saw that my old shoes were kinda beat up, so she bought these ones. I really like them. They’re my favorite color, too.” said Simon.

“Yeah, they’re nice. So, how’s. . . .”


Hope that was entertaining. 😎 Just kidding, that wasn’t the point of this (I promise to get to the point—later). A little over a week ago was Mother’s Day. (Actually, it was supposed to be a week ago, but with finals and everything, I wasn’t able to work on this or publish it last Sunday as planned. Hence, a random Wednesday. In June. Hehe, sorry.)

Honestly, I didn’t do as much as I could’ve and should’ve to honor my mom. For some reason, it was kind of weird. Usually, I do more. This is a shift that many teens go through.

We sometimes use the excuse that our creativity is burnt, and so we just don’t write any cards or organize anything special. And while in some cases burnt imagination does happen, it can also be us teenagers thinking, “I’m too old for little kid cards and pretend spas.” After years of making Valentine’s Day cards for my four older sisters, I’ve learned to just go with the grind. . . even if I get hand cramps.

And I know, sometimes there are things you do when you’re a kid. But even you can be creative. I’m sure of this. The Author of Everything knows this. Simply searching, “things a teenager can do for mother’s day,” Google gave me dozens of options and ideas.

Mother’s Day, however, has already passed. So why would I post this a good deal after Mother’s Day?

We as humans tend to forget the past: one of the main reasons history seems to repeat itself. It’s the same with Mother’s Day. On that day, we remember the love, patience, and selflessness our dear mothers display, and the day after we snap at them for accidentally calling us our dog’s name instead of ours. Why is this?

The answer: life goes on, and we go with it. One day we’re stressing horribly over school, and the next year we completely forget how miserable it was. It’s the same with Mother’s Day.

Now let me answer the question I ignored above: Why would I intend to post this a week after Mother’s Day? As a reminder to not forget to love, honor, and respect our moms.

I can say that, and you can agree, but that doesn’t take us very far, does it? So let me stress one fault that keeps many from seeing how they mistreat their mothers: it is mental blindness. Not being able to hear one’s own tone, see one’s own actions, and maybe even understand the argument of another. Mental blindness is also a form of pride, and pride is powerful.

I’m guilty of this. You may be too. But since we are too blind to see it, how can we fix it?? The answer is simple, but a little difficult.

Suck up your pride, put on some humility, and ask trusted ones. Now, now, before you start exclaiming, “I don’t have the courage to ask my parents that!” That’s not the end of my point. If you don’t have a whole lot of courage yet or struggle with pride, start with friends or mentors—trusted, respectful, hopefully faith-filled friends, especially those who are strong with introspection. The older, the better.

Ask them, “Am I mentally blind? Do I tend to have big faults that I don’t notice? What are they?” And then begin a conversation about this.

From there, either move to siblings or parents (depending on who you’re more comfortable with).

Now here, I got stumped—for several days. “What advice should I provide? What other thoughts should I share?” In all transparency, I didn’t feel qualified to write this. That’s the dilemma I’ve faced with several posts on Christianity, too. Because I’m not even close to perfection in being a Christian and a son, and that’s brought about Writer’s Block.

Wow, that spiel did help. Let’s keep going. I’ll refer back to the conversation at the top. It was a small act of kindness from Simon’s mother. I wanted it to be as random as possible, just to represent day-to-day mother’s intuition.

Now, we don’t know much else about Simon’s mother. I know she’s not perfect. She could be one of those mothers who leaves you thinking, “Wow, he does not deserve a mom like that,” or maybe Simon and she don’t agree or get along. Maybe she’s treated him poorly; maybe she’s neglected him.

However, she’s his mother, and that’s something significant. She did much more than buy him shoes. She gave birth to him, nursed him, and raised him. That is still more than any guy I know could comprehend.

Some mothers are wonderful; some try; some are. . . difficult; some almost completely leave you alone when you become independent—but I haven’t met many of the latter. Whether she deserves it or not (and I’m sure she deserves it), love your mother, and show it.


Now, I’m not saying to walk up to your mother and shout, “Happy belated Mother’s Day!” That’s not what I’m trying to communicate here. It’s a day-by-day thing, and not easy for our imperfect human brains, but do your best to acknowledge her. Reveal your love through quality time, gifts, words of affirmation, physical touch, acts of service, etc.

Start with what you do best, and go from there.

(I hope you enjoyed this and know I love you, Mamá. 🙃)

Farewell, and have a good day! I love how this post is several days closer to Father’s Day than Mother’s Day. Guys, life is radical. ‘Least I’m done with “official” school.

With God’s help,

~Daniel Amador

Christian Living

More Than Religious; We’re Family

I was thinking… about Holy Week and what to teach from it. There are so many lessons and inspirations we can take from even Good Friday to Easter Sunday alone. Why? Because Jesus is rich and abounding in endless knowledge, power, and love.

That weekend around 2,000 years ago, King Jesus revealed to us just a taste of his majesty! He took on pain that would be unbearable for most people of the world; He suffered likely one of the worst deaths in history; and finally, He brought Himself back from death.

Jesus made Death writhe in pain as He tore easily from its icy grasp and Darkness shriek in fear as He stung it with his glory—Christ rose from the grave, undefeated.

I chose just one idea to talk about—the third of Jesus’ last seven messages as He died on the cross.

#3 of the Last 7 Words of Jesus on the Cross

When Jesus saw his mother there, and the disciple who he loved standing nearby, he said to her, “Woman, here is your son” and to the disciple, “Here is your mother.” From that time on, this disciple took her into his home.

John 19:26-27 NIV

Jesus brought about a very important idea for us as Christians with those words.

When you follow Christ, the term ‘family’ becomes more than a legal and biological idea. Every Christian is united in Christ. We are now related by blood: the blood of Jesus. This is the will of God’s Kingdom here on earth: to see those in need and provide for them, to be a particular family figure to one who lacks that person in their lives.

Jesus brought this act into motion. Even while he was dying on the cross in misery, he saw his mother. She had other sons, yes. But Jesus was her firstborn son—the firstborn should be the one to care for the mother in her old age. So he told John, the ‘disciple he loved,’ to be her own son, to look after her as his own mother.

During the early years of the Church, there were not many believers. Those who were were being persecuted. They needed to depend closely on each other in that time of suffering. They needed to lean on each other like they were siblings, fathers, mothers—family.

Nowadays the Church of Christ can seem so large and divided that we don’t even share the same religion, much less family. But Christianity is supposed to be dedication and faith, not just religion, tradition, and rituals.

Background, ethnicity, denomination, and all the like shouldn’t divide us from being family in the One True God. Baptists, Lutherans, Presbyterians; Christian Nigerians, Romanians, Argentinians; Believers of the suburban, rural, and urban areas; them and many, many, many more who know Jesus Christ as their Savior are all are still going to be praising Christ with myself and each other when He comes to take us all Home.

But what about you—personally? I pray God will give you the courage and wisdom to be a father, mother, brother, sister, son, daughter—whatever, to a fellow struggling Child of Christ.

With God’s help,

~Daniel Amador

Christian Living, Relevant Updates, Specials

This Will Not Last is Published!

The day has arrived—This Will Not Last by Laurel Jean is published! 🥳🎉

I’ve been promoting this anthology for quite a while, so I expect I’ve adequately stirred you up! You can purchase This Will Not Last here, on Amazon! Not only will this book perhaps be a blessing to your spirit, but you will also be supporting an up-and-coming young author. 😉

“Eh, I was thinking about purchasing TWNL… but I’m not really doing great in my faith, so I think I’ll pass. Sorry! Maybe I’ll buy her next book.”

Sir, ma’am, this is a collection of poetry for the weary soul! That may be you. I personally am often weary. This was written for the worn-out to remind them that, in Jesus, the pain won’t last! The suffering won’t last! Sorrow won’t last! Weariness won’t last!

Click on the Amazon link. Order this book! Support the author. May your heart be touched by the words printed on those pages. 🙂



On another note, from Reign to Ice—Parts 1 and 2, as well as the Conclusion—will be released on the 15th! I’m hyped about this and hopefully, you are too! I’ve received some great feedback on fRtI (thank you, editors!), and I’ve made some edits on Pt. 1 for the better.

Want to hear what happens to Daegal and the rebels? Curious about Emperor Hadeon’s next move? Visit the Right Kind of Writer on the 15th of April to find out! 😎

With God’s help,

~Daniel Amador

Credit to Laurel Jean for graphics. Image #2 rounded by myself.

Christian Living, Young Adult Life

When Your Hardest Doesn’t Go Highest (Society’s Secret Scandal)

One of the most frustrating experiences for an ambitious youth is to pour all their heart into any sort of project and its ends up fruitless and overlooked. It’s disheartening when you try so hard—harder than all those around you, it seems—and you still end up at the bottom! No one likes to be that one mountain climber who has all the rocks crumbling beneath them.

You keep trying to scale the ladder, but everyone else is either shooting past you, pulling you down, or kicking you back. The whole reason people want to climb high to the top is, simply put, to get that ‘high’ feeling. “So what’s the solution? How can I ever feel truly accomplished if that high only lasts a moment?”

Stop climbing the ladder. Let go and let Jesus carry you.

Maybe that sounds like one of those cute, cliche quotes you’ll find on Social Media that are inspirational… but completely unhelpful. So let me explain further.

Society’s Secret Scandal

Society, today’s popular culture, sees the world as a ladder. A mountain we’re all meant to spend our whole lives climbing. The best future envisioned in society’s eyes is having a good education, spending your youthful days enjoying your physical prime and having as much fun as possible, then spending the rest of your life pursuing what career and person you love, and getting rich and famous off your job—thus making the whole focus of life power and love.

It’s really a hopeless reality.

This is why people who have real relationships with Jesus tend to have better mental, emotional, and physical health. Even if they still deal with depression, sickness, weakness, and other struggles, they know where they’re going, they know they have a purpose, and they know they are loved! If purpose is power (maybe a mental power), then the real Christian has power, love, and destiny. That’s a one-up to society. 😎

All this to say, society’s secret scandal is the sly lie it spreads to every teenager and young adult: if you can’t climb high, you don’t deserve the high, or happiness.

Jesus’ Generous Gift

Your hardest climbing might not always bring you to the top. Your fastest running might not always bring you farthest. That’s when society’s lie kicks in. You feel hopeless, undeserving, and good-for-nothing.

So when your hardest doesn’t go highest, doesn’t take you higher, don’t believe the society’s sneaky lie—instead, remember Jesus’ generous gift! Salvation from hopelessness. Peace during the storms. Eternal paradise in Heaven when you die. Never-ending forgiveness through repentance.

Never give up on what God is calling you to do! Also, remember that hard work doesn’t do it all—knowledge of what you’re pursuing, wisdom on how to pursue it, and support from those more experienced are all vital!

Let me rephrase: Stop climbing the ladder. Let go and let Christ carry you—even if he takes you off the wide ladder to the narrow pathway on the side. After all, Jesus’ plans do seem sideways to the popular culture. 😉

With God’s help,

Daniel Amador

Christian Living, Relevant Updates

February Hiatus + Your Help + Poetry Book Cover Reveal

February last year was fairly uneventful on the Right Kind of Writer. August that year was even less—only one post published! Both of those two months ended up having the lowest statistics (lowest views, visitors, comments, and likes) in their halves of the 2021. I then realized something else: they are both exactly half a year apart, separated by five months on either side.

So an idea popped into my head. What if February and August are the months where I take a pause from blogging and inquire of my readers’ thoughts on the RKW? 🤯 In fact, the last time I asked for your thoughts was in July, the month just before August. I tossed that idea around in my head a bit, and I really like it. February is when school goes in full throttle after Christmas break, and August is the concluding month of summer vacation.

Plus, I need a break. From my point of view at least, I’ve been lacking and slacking in quality—putting quantity over it. Blogging is getting tiresome, but I still love doing it. So I’m putting the plan into action. 😎

I am taking an official break from blogging in the short month of February. If I do happen to show up sometime within the month, it’s to make an important announcement—maybe I’ll be required to post something for a book launch, or a friend starts up a blog of their own, or something.

As for whether I’ll take a break in August, only God knows what’ll happen in the future, but I do plan to. For February though, expect several changes!


If you’ve made it this far in the post, I applaud you. 👏 But this is where you are really needed! Here, I’ll say it again for those in the back—and those skimming. 😉

I NEED YOU!

I would really appreciate your thoughts and all that jazz on this blog of mine! So I’ve created a form. It’s quite simple and straight-forward, and I’d be very grateful if you filled it out!

Click here for the survey!

Thank you very much! I hope to come back after February with several great-quality, stimulating, thoughtful, and fun posts. 😀



Cover Reveal

Two weeks ago I announced the title reveal for blogger, writer, and poet Laurel Jean’s book of poetry, This Will Not Last. Today, I have the honor of presenting the cover to Laurel’s anthology!

Before I do, though, I like to take the time to give a brief message from her involving the meaning behind the cover:

…if I’m being completely honest, one of the first reasons it’s fairly simple is because I’m not extremely experienced in graphic design, but the control freak in me wanted to design my own book cover, in spite of that. XD I do genuinely appreciate simplicity, though. While writing poetry, I love to use a minimal amount of words to get my point across, and I feel that the cover of This Will Not Last really reflects that minimalism. Also, I really like how it looks like there’s light dimly shining through a blue haze on the cover. That definitely portrays the spirit of the collection!

Laurel Jean

Now for *ahem* the cover.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

So close!

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Aaaand. . .

.

.

.

.

.

.

Voila!

Credit to Laurel Jean for cover.

Is it not lovely? Allow me to get more solemn for a moment. I see the cover and it gives me a feeling like I’m drowning, a feeling that I’m surrounded and it’s hard to breathe. Then, I see a light. It’s dim, yes, but truly it is there! Even as I’m clutching tightly to my chest, straining for life, I can know that this will not last.

The idea of TWNT is as simple as that. It’s poetry for weary souls, pointing us to the Light—to Christ, and to the truth that this time of suffering won’t last. I do love that. The cover, the title, and the blurb (found here) depict that beautifully.

Here’s another TWNT graphic:

Credit to Laurel Jean for graphic.

That is all for February. I hope you enjoyed reading, and thank you to those who filled out the reader’s survey! God bless, and see you in March!

With God’s help,

Daniel Amador

Christian Living

Why Fasting is Better Than You Think

If you saw the title of this post and rolled your eyes or had feelings of annoyance, this post will be good for you, and is for you! If not, you should still probably read it anyway.

Yesterday, our church finished our 21 days of prayer and fasting—every year for many years our church has done 21 days of prayer and fasting in the month of January. I joined in with them, and even though it could have always been better—as in I could have always tried harder to pray more and resist more, it was good for me, both in spirit and bodily health.

Today I want to share with you why fasting is so important, why you should consider it, and I’ll also clear up some misconceptions.

For starters, this is what fasting is: Wordly sacrifices for spiritual benefits.

That takes me to…

Why You Are Fasting

Truly, everything in this post points back to this: why you are fasting. People in the Bible fasted for different reasons. Nehemiah fasted out of sadness (Nehemiah 1:4). Moses fasted for Words from the Lord: wisdom and commandments (Exodus 34:28). Jesus fasted before he took on a big project: his ministry to save humankind (Matthew 4:1-11, Mark 1:13, Luke 4:1-13).

You can fast for all sorts of reasons—mourning, confessing sins, seeking wisdom, preparing for something big.

The whole idea of fasting is to focus less on (even temporarily turn away from) worldly distractions and focus more on God and prayer; to have a time of spiritual healing, restoration, and/or strengthening. I’ll say it again: worldly sacrifices for spiritual benefits.

The above 112 words form—in reality—the main point. Now, I’d like to talk briefly on 4 other factors that are important and need to be addressed. I know I tend to rant, but I will try to keep it concise, every sentence I write having a purpose.

1. What To Fast From

Biblical fasting was most commonly from food, often even food and water. However, there are other unnecessary nonessential distracting activities, as well as worldly items that take your attention, that could be fasted from. Food is important, but of course there are circumstances where it’s not the best thing to fast from.

Activities: Preparation of a meal, video games, social media, TV, listening to secular music, I could go on. The last four listed are not necessary. You could spend your ‘social media time’ reading God’s Word. You could listen to Christian music instead of secular music.

As for the first listed, your body needs water and food to keep on functioning. You could have easy-to-make meals so that you can pray while you prepare. Before you fast I suggest writing down a list of healthy, easy meals, then go out and get ingredients for them.

Items: Chocolate. You don’t need it. Your phone. You don’t need it (well, maybe you do but there are things you use it for that you don’t have to). Coffee. You don’t need it. Have I made my point clear yet?

Sacrifice. If you utter one single prayer to God, something like, “fix all my problems please,” I bet you He won’t do it. Anyone can say that. But not everyone has the strength to sacrifice in order to have ‘all their problems fixed.’ If you really do believe in God and love Him, you have more than likely sacrificed. You spend your Sunday morning with the Church; you’ve quit bad habits; all that. When you fast, you’re just sacrificing even more and I’m sure, at the end of the day, you will reap the benefits!

No sacrifice I could offer would be anywhere near what Jesus sacrificed for us when He literally died on a cross. That is in fact one of the most painful ways to die, and He did it for us, because He loves us. The least we can do in return is sacrifice some of the things we treasure on this earth.

In conclusion, focus on anything that’ll encourage you to look to Christ, and avoid anything that will point you away.

2. How Long To Fast

Now you have in mind what you will be fasting from. “Great,” you might be thinking. “I’m not going to go on social media or eat chocolate. For how long??”

Good question!

It’s really up to you and what you feel God calling you to do. It also depends on why you’re fasting. You could fast for a day, a week, even a month. (It also depends on what you’re fasting from. I’m not telling you to fast from all food for a month.)

3. Other Benefits of Fasting

Fasting is not dieting. You fast because you want to grow closer to God. But physical and/or mental health benefits do often come included!

Mental: In sacrificing, you’ll build up self-control, which is a very important virtue. If you succeed, you’ll be more confident in your abilities to resist. Then there’s social media: it can literally destroy your mental health. That’s not a lie. The more time you spend reading instead of scrolling, the cleaner your mind will be. Of course, if you slip and catch yourself giving into temptation, do not let it sink and do not quit. Apologize to God, then get back up.

Physical: Your taste buds are crying out, “we want sugar! We want sweets!” Do not listen to them! They don’t see the big picture of your whole bodily health. Unhealthy foods bring temporary pleasure, but healthy foods bring longer-term strength and health. This is really all I need to say.

4. Avoid Being the Pharisee

I’ve always been a rule-following control freak with the (God-given) mind and qualities of a leader. The title of ‘pastor’s kid’ only increased the significance of that. When I was younger, during the 21 days of fasting our church had I’d always be like the Pharisees in Jesus’ time. Focusing on the actual doing instead of the real meaning. I would subtly, sometimes even directly, ridicule my brothers and friends for not fasting from as much as I was or caving into temptation.

Don’t go there. It’s not a healthy place. Jesus called the people who were like that whitewashed tombs. That’s not a title anyone would want to be given, especially by the Son of God, King of kings.

I’m trying much harder to not be like that but to be merciful (when need be) and kind. When people see me, I want them to see someone who intentionally does things for a true and good purpose and not just to appear superior and cool.


This is all I have to say. In conclusion, please consider fasting! If you’re only a teenager and not quite an adult yet, maybe talk with your parents about a more serious fast. Actually, talk with your parents about it anyway, serious or not, adult or not! It’s something I need to do more of. Well, God bless and see you next week!

With God’s help,

Daniel Amador