Christian Living

More Than Religious; We’re Family

I was thinking… about Holy Week and what to teach from it. There are so many lessons and inspirations we can take from even Good Friday to Easter Sunday alone. Why? Because Jesus is rich and abounding in endless knowledge, power, and love.

That weekend around 2,000 years ago, King Jesus revealed to us just a taste of his majesty! He took on pain that would be unbearable for most people of the world; He suffered likely one of the worst deaths in history; and finally, He brought Himself back from death.

Jesus made Death writhe in pain as He tore easily from its icy grasp and Darkness shriek in fear as He stung it with his glory—Christ rose from the grave, undefeated.

I chose just one idea to talk about—the third of Jesus’ last seven messages as He died on the cross.

#3 of the Last 7 Words of Jesus on the Cross

When Jesus saw his mother there, and the disciple who he loved standing nearby, he said to her, “Woman, here is your son” and to the disciple, “Here is your mother.” From that time on, this disciple took her into his home.

John 19:26-27 NIV

Jesus brought about a very important idea for us as Christians with those words.

When you follow Christ, the term ‘family’ becomes more than a legal and biological idea. Every Christian is united in Christ. We are now related by blood: the blood of Jesus. This is the will of God’s Kingdom here on earth: to see those in need and provide for them, to be a particular family figure to one who lacks that person in their lives.

Jesus brought this act into motion. Even while he was dying on the cross in misery, he saw his mother. She had other sons, yes. But Jesus was her firstborn son—the firstborn should be the one to care for the mother in her old age. So he told John, the ‘disciple he loved,’ to be her own son, to look after her as his own mother.

During the early years of the Church, there were not many believers. Those who were were being persecuted. They needed to depend closely on each other in that time of suffering. They needed to lean on each other like they were siblings, fathers, mothers—family.

Nowadays the Church of Christ can seem so large and divided that we don’t even share the same religion, much less family. But Christianity is supposed to be dedication and faith, not just religion, tradition, and rituals.

Background, ethnicity, denomination, and all the like shouldn’t divide us from being family in the One True God. Baptists, Lutherans, Presbyterians; Christian Nigerians, Romanians, Argentinians; Believers of the suburban, rural, and urban areas; them and many, many, many more who know Jesus Christ as their Savior are all are still going to be praising Christ with myself and each other when He comes to take us all Home.

But what about you—personally? I pray God will give you the courage and wisdom to be a father, mother, brother, sister, son, daughter—whatever, to a fellow struggling Child of Christ.

With God’s help,

~Daniel Amador